Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment (C-PREE)

C-PREE is an interdisciplinary research center at the Princeton School for Public and International Affairs committed to training leaders in the field of environmental and energy policy. We develop rigorous research that blends scientific knowledge and methods with social science and practitioner perspectives in ways that yield practical solutions for the major environmental and energy challenges facing the world today.


 

News

Elke Weber receives BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge Award
Author
Written by Colton Poore, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment
Cognitive psychologist Elke Weber has been awarded a Frontiers of Knowledge Award in humanities and social sciences from the BBVA Foundation.

Weber, the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor of Energy and the Environment and professor of psychology and public affairs…

Compact Urban Development Could Reduce Chinese Transport Emissions and Provide Considerable Environmental Co-benefits
Author
Written by Cara Clase, Ph.D., Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment

With 23% of energy-related carbon emissions coming from transportation, climate change mitigation will require a deep decarbonization of the transport sector.  In China, transport contributes 10% to national carbon emissions as well as contributing to particulate matter (PM2.5 ) and ozone formation that damage human health, agriculture,…

Research Shows Institutional Factors are Key in Improving Sustainability Models
Author
Written by Cara Clase, Ph.D., Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment

One way researchers analyze real-world, sustainability questions is by utilizing computational models.  These models use data to derive the relationships between economic, social, and natural systems and quantify the potential outcomes of public policies and behavioral changes.  Sustainability models have provided useful insights on a…

Rapidly-Intensifying Tropical Cyclones Likely to Increase Flood Hazard in the North Atlantic as Climate Warms
Author
Written by Cara Clase, Ph.D., Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment

Many of the most devastating tropical cyclones (TCs) in history, including Hurricanes Andrew (1992) and Katrina (2005), underwent a process known as rapid intensification (RI). Defined by a wind speed increase of at least 30 knots (35 mph) within a 24-hour period, RI can be difficult to predict and can leave coastal regions with little time to…