David Bradford Energy and Environmental Policy Seminar Series

This seminar series is named after the late Prof. David Bradford (1939-2005), who previously served as a director of the Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (STEP) Program at the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. Bradford, a professor of economics and public affairs, helped initiate and organize this seminar series in the early 2000s, inviting speakers to share their research on science policy topics. C-PREE continues to organize the seminar series each year, highlighting scholars and practitioners from various fields working on critical research related to environmental and energy policy. Since its inception in Fall 1999, this series has hosted hundreds of speakers who are influential in science & environmental policy.

The seminar series is co-sponsored by the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI).

In Fall 2022, we are resuming in person seminars. At this time, only Princeton University ID card holders and invited guests may attend in person. All others are invited to watch the seminars over livestream on the MediaCentral site.

Recordings of past talks can be found on the archived events pages in this website or on our YouTube channel.

Scheduled

Projecting the Clean Tech Race: Modelling Technologies’ Competition Dynamics and Implications for Policy Design
Nov 28, 2022, 12:15 pm

Tobias Schmidt is Associate (tenured) Professor and head of the Energy and Technology Policy Group (EPG) at ETH Zurich. He also serves as the director of Institute of Science, Technology and Policy (ISTP). He is currently a visiting fellow at Princeton’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment as well as the Center for Policy Research…

Location
300 Wallace Hall
Speaker
In-person attendance for Princeton University ID holders and invited guests; Livestream open to the public on MediaCentral.
Critical Data Gaps in Climate Change Adaptation Modeling
Dec 5, 2022, 12:15 pm

Agent-based modeling – in which system-level outcomes emerge from interactions among individuals and their environment – can provide unique insights in the study of livelihoods decision-making and adaptation responses to climate hazards and shocks.  However, finding empirical support for the underlying behavioral assumptions in ABM can be…

Location
300 Wallace Hall
In-person attendance for Princeton University ID holders and invited guests; Livestream open to the public on MediaCentral.