Climate Adaptation

Human actions are significantly impacting Earth's environment. Scientists have strengthened their ability to attribute certain changes, especially related to sea-level rise and extreme weather events, to global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change are more obviously beginning to influence communities around the world, and are expected to generate even more challenging consequences in the future. Even as governments and industry must work rapidly to cut emissions to prevent the worst effects of a warming climate, communities must also take actions now to begin adapting to the new realities that global warming will certainly bring. This is particularly urgent for people living in areas historically subject to extreme heat, semi-arid zones, coastal areas, small island nations, or communities that live in or near the Arctic Circle.

Our faculty and researchers deploy their expertise in natural sciences, engineering, and economics to model how global warming will influence sea level rise, coastal flooding, hurricanes, heat waves, and droughts, and the communities who experience them.

From a policy perspective, our researchers recommend policies and actions to both lessen climate change risks and also prepare for the impact that an already warming climate is having on communities.

Related News

Extreme Climate Fluctuation Drives South African Domestic Migration
Feb. 28, 2022
Author
Written by Riis Williams and B. Rose Huber, Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

As the climate crisis worsens, some South Africans are relocating to places with more stable climate conditions, according to a study led by Princeton University researchers. 

Using…

Policy Interventions Could Help Farmers Economically Survive in Vulnerable Regions
Dec. 1, 2021
Author
Written by B. Rose Huber, Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

In the grasslands of Nepal’s Chitwan Valley, local farmers rely on the production of rice and other grains to generate household income. But their livelihoods are under threat, as Nepal is experiencing the effects of climate change at a much faster rate than the global average.

As these effects worsen, it’s unclear what smallholder…

Tackling Climate Change’s Most Complex Phenomena
Nov. 9, 2021
Author
Written by Riis L. Williams

A new partnership between Princeton University’s Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment (C-PREE) and the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) is pairing students and researchers to work on solutions to today…

Princeton voices: Speaking out on climate change, heat waves, wildfires and more
Aug. 10, 2021
Author
Written by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications

The triple-digit temperatures sweeping across the country this summer go far beyond routine weather fluctuations. Indeed, June 2021 was the hottest June in the history of national weather records, and by the end of July, fully 40% of the nation was experiencing drought, which contributed to a western wildfire season whose smoke reached…

Climate Change “Winners” May Owe Financial Compensation to Polluters
March 2, 2021
Author
Written by Keely Swan, Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment

Climate change is generally portrayed as an environmental and societal threat with entirely negative consequences. However, some sectors of the global economy may actually end up benefiting.

Related People

Guy Nordenson
Professor of Architecture
Michael Oppenheimer
Director of the Center for Policy Research on Energy and Environment
Lisa Thalheimer
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Melissa Tier
STEP Ph.D. Student
Rachel Young
STEP Ph.D. Student
Alice Zhang
Postdoctoral Research Associate (2019-20)