Energy Systems

Energy sectors account for roughly two thirds (~64%) of total greenhouse gas emissions contributing to global warming. This includes everything from the fuels that powers our vehicles and heat our homes to commercial and industrial consumption of electricity and fossil fuels. Our researchers model various energy-production scenarios that would allow countries to decrease their carbon footprint while meeting goals for more sustainable growth and development. They also study the policies and incentives that govern decision-making around energy sectors, including the role of foreign investment in emerging markets.

Related News

Americans are Unaware of Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology, According to a New Study
June 15, 2021
Author
Written by Molly Seltzer, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment
Capturing carbon at the smokestack is a promising way to combat climate change, but the majority of Americans are unfamiliar with the technology,…
Cutting Methane Emissions Quickly Could Slow Climate Warming Rate by 30%
April 27, 2021
Author
Written by Environmental Defense Fund (adapted)
New analysis highlights dramatic benefit of swift action on a potent greenhouse gas, underscores missed opportunity if solutions are slow or…
East Asian Development Banks are Now Largest Public Financiers of Global Power Sector, Particularly Coal
April 1, 2021
Author
Written by Keely Swan and Sean Miller

While the World Bank and other multilateral development banks are increasingly investing in renewable technologies and phasing out coal power financing, several of the world’s largest national-level funders — East Asian development finance institutions — are among the last public financiers supporting coal power plants.

Implementing Carbon Pricing during the Pandemic Could Help Countries Recover Greener, Smarter
Nov. 16, 2020
Author
Written by Keely Swan, Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment

Countries across the globe have been struggling to deal with the impact of Covid-19 and its accompanying economic slowdown. As economies “build back better,” it may be an opportune time to introduce carbon pricing to tackle climate change, according to new Princeton University policy research.

Addressing humanity’s environmental challenges
Oct. 15, 2020
Author
Written by Office of Communications

Environmental challenges have galvanized activity across Princeton’s campus in recent years like few other issues in our history. From physical, biological and applied sciences to art, architecture, psychology, policy and more, research groups across the University are tackling some of the toughest problems facing humanity with the fullest range of toolkits.

Opinion: Put a Price on Carbon Now!
May 7, 2020
Author
Written by Peter Singer and Kian Mintz-Woo

Before the COVID-19 pandemic and the accompanying fall in oil prices, a carbon price would have been immediately painful for the countries that imposed it, but far better for everyone over the longer term. In this unprecedented moment, introducing a carbon price would be beneficial both now and for the future.

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